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Click here to download the full example code

Streaming data from DANDI

This script shows how to stream data from the DANDI Archive all the way to pynapple.

Warning

This tutorial uses seaborn and matplotlib for displaying the figure as well as the DANDI package

You can install all with pip install matplotlib seaborn dandi


Prelude

The data used in this tutorial were used in this publication: Sargolini, Francesca, et al. "Conjunctive representation of position, direction, and velocity in entorhinal cortex." Science 312.5774 (2006): 758-762. The data can be found on the DANDI Archive in Dandiset 000582.

mkdocs_gallery_thumbnail_number = 2


DANDI

DANDI allows you to stream data without downloading all the files. In this case the data extracted from the NWB file are stored in the nwb-cache folder.

from pynwb import NWBHDF5IO

from dandi.dandiapi import DandiAPIClient
import fsspec
from fsspec.implementations.cached import CachingFileSystem
import h5py


# ecephys
dandiset_id, filepath = (
    "000582",
    "sub-10073/sub-10073_ses-17010302_behavior+ecephys.nwb",
)


with DandiAPIClient() as client:
    asset = client.get_dandiset(dandiset_id, "draft").get_asset_by_path(filepath)
    s3_url = asset.get_content_url(follow_redirects=1, strip_query=True)

# first, create a virtual filesystem based on the http protocol
fs = fsspec.filesystem("http")

# create a cache to save downloaded data to disk (optional)
fs = CachingFileSystem(
    fs=fs,
    cache_storage="nwb-cache",  # Local folder for the cache
)

# next, open the file
file = h5py.File(fs.open(s3_url, "rb"))
io = NWBHDF5IO(file=file, load_namespaces=True)

print(io)

Out:

A newer version (0.62.1) of dandi/dandi-cli is available. You are using 0.61.2
<pynwb.NWBHDF5IO object at 0x7f5f37a6b730>

Pynapple

If opening the NWB works, you can start streaming data straight into pynapple with the NWBFile class.

import pynapple as nap
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns
import numpy as np

custom_params = {"axes.spines.right": False, "axes.spines.top": False}
sns.set_theme(style="ticks", palette="colorblind", font_scale=1.5, rc=custom_params)

nwb = nap.NWBFile(io.read())

print(nwb)

Out:

17010302
┍━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━┯━━━━━━━━━━┑
 Keys                 Type     ┝━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━┿━━━━━━━━━━┥
 units                TsGroup   ElectricalSeriesLFP  Tsd       SpatialSeriesLED1    TsdFrame  ElectricalSeries     Tsd      ┕━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━━┷━━━━━━━━━━┙

We can load the spikes as a TsGroup for inspection.

units = nwb["units"]

print(units)

Out:

  Index     rate  unit_name    histology    hemisphere      depth
-------  -------  -----------  -----------  ------------  -------
      0  2.93217  t1c1         MEC LII                     0.0024
      1  1.50193  t2c1         MEC LII                     0.0024
      2  2.57878  t2c3         MEC LII                     0.0024
      3  1.13186  t3c1         MEC LII                     0.0024
      4  1.29356  t3c2         MEC LII                     0.0024
      5  1.35857  t3c3         MEC LII                     0.0024
      6  2.8855   t3c4         MEC LII                     0.0024
      7  1.46525  t4c1         MEC LII                     0.0024

As well as the position

position = nwb["SpatialSeriesLED1"]

Here we compute the 2d tuning curves

tc, binsxy = nap.compute_2d_tuning_curves(units, position, 20)

Let's plot the tuning curves

plt.figure(figsize=(15, 7))
for i in tc.keys():
    plt.subplot(2, 4, i + 1)
    plt.imshow(tc[i], origin="lower", aspect="auto")
    plt.title("Unit {}".format(i))
plt.tight_layout()
plt.show()

Unit 0, Unit 1, Unit 2, Unit 3, Unit 4, Unit 5, Unit 6, Unit 7

Let's plot the spikes of unit 1 who has a nice grid Here I use the function value_from to assign to each spike the closest position in time.

plt.figure(figsize=(15, 6))
plt.subplot(121)
extent = (
    np.min(position["x"]),
    np.max(position["x"]),
    np.min(position["y"]),
    np.max(position["y"]),
)
plt.imshow(tc[1], origin="lower", extent=extent, aspect="auto")
plt.xlabel("x")
plt.ylabel("y")

plt.subplot(122)
plt.plot(position["y"], position["x"], color="grey")
spk_pos = units[1].value_from(position)
plt.plot(spk_pos["y"], spk_pos["x"], "o", color="red", markersize=5, alpha=0.5)
plt.xlabel("x")
plt.ylabel("y")
plt.tight_layout()
plt.show()

tutorial pynapple dandi

Total running time of the script: ( 0 minutes 3.840 seconds)

Download Python source code: tutorial_pynapple_dandi.py

Download Jupyter notebook: tutorial_pynapple_dandi.ipynb

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